5 Things That Can Affect Your Housing Loan

housing loanEvery year, the number of new homeowners dwindles.

There are several reasons why. It could be due to outlying student debt or diminished general appeal. Or maybe it’s simply the daunting task of trying to get a housing loan.

Becoming eligible for a loan can seem difficult, but no home seeker should let that stop them. We’re here to help you learn the things that can affect the approval of your loan.

Let’s get into it.

Credit Score

Banks and other lenders will take a look at your credit score to know whether giving you a loan will be a risky investment on their part or not. The amount of income you make doesn’t have much of a say on this. You could make a lot of money and still have a bad credit score.

Your credit score can have an effect on how much of a loan you can get, as well as the interest rate.

Take some time to find out your own credit score before approaching any lenders. Be certain to check your credit report for errors or flaws. You don’t want any wrong information to affect your rates or chance to secure a loan.

Being Self-Employed Can Deny You a Housing Loan

Regardless of how much you make in a year through your self-employment endeavors, the fact remains that it can look poorly to banks and other lenders. Self-employment can look far too variable in their eyes and can make you seem like a risky investment.

Unfortunately, there isn’t much you can do about this, but it is good to know about so that there aren’t any surprises coming your way.

A good thing would be to bring any pay stubs with you when meeting with your potential lenders. This could help you get a quicker approval.

Never Had a Loan

Strange as it may sound, sometimes being loan-free can be a bad thing. Because you’ve never taken a loan before, banks and other lenders can’t easily decide if you are a trustworthy client or not.

Are you the type of person to pay on time? They have no way of knowing and it’s likely they aren’t willing to take that risk.

One way around this predicament is to take out a small personal loan or credit card a year or two before. If you make the payments on time or are able to pay the loan back, you will build up your credit score and show banks that you can be trusted.

Debt to Income Ratio

A lot of the time, people will try to get a loan for far more than they can actually afford. This will, in turn, plummet their credit score and end up being more trouble than it needs to be.

Knowing your Debt to Income Ratio is a good way to figure out how to make a loan’s payment reliably with your monthly income, all while factoring in all of your other due payments as well.

Take a moment to look at your numbers before deciding how much to ask for your housing loan.

Being Dishonest

It could be tempting to try and hide a particular debt in order to get a housing loan, or maybe make a bad set of debt seem a little better. But honesty is definitely the best policy when it comes to dealing with banks and lenders.

Being dishonest in any of this will risk you being charged with fraud, and it will make it much more difficult to ever find a bank or lender that will want to work with you in the future.

Conclusion

We hope that this has helped you understand more about the process and that you’ll find it easier to expect what will affect your loan. We wish you all the luck in the world for the future.

The feeling of owning that perfect house is way too precious. And we want to help you!

If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact us!

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week – June 5, 2017

Last week’s economic releases included readings on inflation, core inflation pending home sales and multiple reports from the labor sector. Weekly readings on mortgage rates and new jobless claims were also released. Pending home sales were lower and weekly jobless claims rose, which illustrates continued volatility in the economic sector.

Inflation rose 0.40 percent in April, which matched projections and exceeded April’s reading of 0.30 percent. Core inflation, which excludes volatile food and energy sectors, grew by 0.20 percent and exceeded expectations of 0.10 percent growth based on a negative reading of -0.20 percent in March. The Federal Reserve has set an annual inflation rate of 0.20 percent as a benchmark for economic recovery.

Housing Data Mixed

Case-Shiller released its 20-City Housing Market Index for March; Home price appreciation held steady at 5.90 percent on a seasonally-adjusted basis year-over-year. Month-to-month, home prices rose by 0.90 percent. Seattle, Washington had the highest pace of home price growth in March, with 12.30 percent. Portland, Oregon followed with 9.20 percent home price growth and Dallas, Texas had the third highest level of year-over-year home price growth at 8.60 percent. Month-to-month home prices grew at a pace of 0.90 percent.

Despite indications of high builder confidence in current and future housing market conditions, construction spending decreased by -1.40 percent in April. Analysts expected an increase of 0.50 percent in construction spending based on construction spending growth of 1.10 percent in March.

Builders have consistently cited concerns over affordable lots and skilled labor, but industry professionals are not sure why high builder confidence in housing markets doesn’t correspond to lagging construction spending rates. Building more homes is viewed as the only path to easing high demand for homes caused by a shortage of homes for sale.

The Commerce Department reported fewer pending home sales in April with a reading of -1.30 percent; the March reading was -0.90 percent. Pending home sales typically indicate further closed sales and trends in mortgage loans.

Mortgage Rates Mixed, New Jobless Claims Rise

Freddie Mac reported slight change in mortgage rates last week; the average rate for a 30-year fixed rate mortgage was one basis point lower 3.94 percent. Rates for a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 3.19 percent and was unchanged from the prior week. The average rate for a 5/1 variable rate mortgage rose four basis points to 3.11 percent. Discount points averaged 0.50 percent for all three types of mortgages.

New Jobless Claims Hit 5Week High

First-time claims rose from the prior week’s reading of 235,000 new claims to 248,000 new claims filed. Analysts had expected 239,000 new claims filed. Analysts said that higher claims were connected to the Memorial Day holiday and characterized last week’s higher number of claims as a “blip.”

In other labor-sector news, ADP reported 253,000 new private-sector jobs in May; the Commerce Department reported 138,000 new government and private sector jobs. This reading may be revised based on an expected 185,000 public and private-sectors jobs for May and April’s reading of 174,000 public and private-sector jobs.

National unemployment ticked down in May to 4.30 percent. Analysts had expected no change in April’s reading of 4.40 percent.

Whats Ahead

This week’s scheduled economic news includes readings on job openings, consumer credit along with weekly reports on mortgage rates and new jobless claims.

What You Need To Know About Getting Your Next Mortgage

Yes, It's Getting Easier to Get a Mortgage. Here's How You Can Take AdvantageIt can be hard to stay on top of the changing real estate market from day-to-day. As a matter of fact, there are more available mortgage products out there than ever before for many kinds of homebuyers. If you’re wondering how you can take advantage of easier lending opportunities and strike while the iron is hot, here are some things to consider.

Take Care Of Your Credit

While many regulations on mortgage applications may have been loosened in recent years, having a better credit score will still enable you to qualify for a mortgage much easier. Instead of risking it, ensure that you’ve obtained a copy of your credit score and are aware of where you stand as a financial risk. By working on your credit and correcting any errors on the report, it will be that much more likely to have your mortgage application approved.

Saving For A Down Payment

It’s often said that 20% is the ideal amount to put down in order to avoid private mortgage insurance, but it’s not the required amount in order to invest in a home. While it may save money in the long run to put more money down, there are many opportunities for putting a lot less down and still being able to purchase. You may want to hold off until you can save up for your down payment, but possibilities do exist for mortgages with as little as 3.5% down.

Dealing With Closing Costs

Saving up for a down payment and deciding to invest in a monthly mortgage payment is a significant commitment. Adding mortgage closing costs to that can be a bridge too far for many potential homebuyers. Fortunately, many lenders are offering the opportunity for closing costs like origination and attorney fees to be included in the total cost of the loan. While this will bump up the amount of your monthly payment, it can make a mortgage more feasible from the start.

For many people, there’s a lot of stress that goes along with applying for a mortgage, but with lower down payments required and closing costs included in the total price, getting approved has become a lot easier. If you’re currently in the market for a new home, contact us for more information.

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week – May 22, 2017

Last week’s economic reports included readings from the National Association of Home Builders, Commerce Department readings on housing starts and building permits and weekly reports on mortgage rates and new jobless claims.

NAHB Housing Market Index Rises, Exceeds Expectations

Builder Sentiment rose two points in May, which exceeded expectations of no change to April’s reading of 68. Builders and analysts said that short inventories of available homes continue to drive demand for new homes. While index readings jumped immediately after the Presidential election in November, builder enthusiasm settled when tariffs on lumber were increased.

Two of three components used in calculating the NAHB Housing Market Index reading. Builder confidence in current housing market conditions gained two points to a reading of 76; Confidence in market conditions over the next six months gained four points to 79. The reading for buyer traffic in new home developments fell one point to 51. Any reading over 50 is considered positive in NAHB HMI reports.

Housing Starts, Building Permits Lower in April

Despite rising home builder confidence in current and future housing markets, housing starts and building permits issued were lower in April than for March. According to the Commerce Department, 1.172 million homes were started in April as compared to 1.203 million housing starts reported in March; April’s housing starts were 0.070 percent higher year over year. Analysts had expected a reading of 1,259 million starts, which are calculated on a seasonally-adjusted annual basis.

Builders started single-family homes at a seasonally- adjusted annual pace of 835,000 homes in April, which indicated that builders may be gaining confidence in building homes for sale as compared to rental units. Building permits were issued at a pace of 1,229 million on a seasonally-adjusted annual basis; this was lower than the March reading of 1.260 million permits issued.

The apparent lag between strong builder sentiment and housing starts and permits could be due to ongoing concerns over increasing materials prices and shortages of buildable lots and labor needed to ramp up home construction.

Mortgage Rates, Weekly Jobless Claims Fall

Mortgage rates fell last week. Freddie Mac reported that the average rate for a 30-year fixed rate mortgage averaged three basis points lower at 4.02 percent. Rates for a 15-year fixed rate mortgage averaged 3.27 percent, a drop of two basis points over the prior week. Mortgage rates for a 5/1 adjustable rate mortgage averaged 3.13 percent, which was one basis point lower than the prior week. Discount points were unchanged at an average of 0.50 percent for all three mortgage types reported.

New jobless claims were lower than expected last week, with 232,000 new claims filed as compared to 240,000 new claims expected and 236,000 claims reported the prior week. Low readings for new unemployment claims suggest strong jobs markets, but can be volatile and subject to adjustment.

Whats Ahead

This week’s scheduled economic reports include readings on new and existing home sales and consumer sentiment. Mortgage rates and new jobless claims will also be released.