How To Pay Off Your Mortgage Early: 4 Methods That Work

How To Pay Off Your Mortgage Early 4 Methods That WorkWhile a mortgage is a necessity for many people who have the dream of owning a home, it is also a form of debt. Most people do not like owing money to someone else. Therefore, homeowners might be looking for ways to pay off their mortgage early. The reality is that people are charged interest for having a mortgage. If a mortgage is paid off early, this is less money than the bank will take and more money in the pockets of homeowners.

There are a few methods people can use to pay off their mortgage early.

Make Extra Payments

At the beginning of a mortgage, the vast majority of the money that people send the bank goes toward interest. In the end, most of the payment covers the principle of the loan. If someone is willing to make extra payments, these added payments are going to directly attack the principle. When the principle shrinks, there is less interest that accrues. Making extra payments is the most direct way to attack a home loan and pay it off more quickly.

Refinance The Mortgage

Another option people should consider is refinancing the mortgage. Essentially, a homeowner takes out a second home loan that pays off the first home loan; however, the new home loan has a lower interest rate. This may allow people to pay off the loan more quickly. Furthermore, people can refinance to a shorter-term, allowing them to pay off the loan more quickly.

Recast The Mortgage

Recasting the mortgage is a little bit different than refinancing. In recasting the loan, people throw a lump sum at the principle in exchange for a new amortization schedule based on that lump sum. This means that people will have a new schedule that reflects the principle that is left, often resulting in a shorter payment schedule.

Split The Monthly Payment In Two

Finally, many people are paid biweekly. Therefore, it might be easier for people to pay their mortgage biweekly. If someone pays their mortgage biweekly, they are making 26 half-payments per year or 13 monthly payments per year. The effect is that someone makes one extra monthly payment per year. This payment attacks the principal directly, helping people pay off their mortgage faster.

3 Signs It Is Time For You To Refinance Your Mortgage

3 Signs It Is Time For You To Refinance Your MortgageIf you are looking for ways to save money on your mortgage, refinancing might be a good option. For those who might not know, refinancing can help a homeowner reduce monthly mortgage payments by switching to a lower interest rate. 

Basically, the homeowner takes out one loan at a lower interest rate to pay off the old loan, which is at a higher interest rate. While the homeowner may have to pay closing costs a second time, this could save someone hundreds of thousands of dollars over the life of the loan. Furthermore, those who want to pay off their loan more quickly may be able to do this as well. There are a few signs that someone should refinance their home loan immediately.

1. Current Mortgage Rates Are Significantly Lower

One of the biggest signs that someone should refinance is that current home loan interest rates are way lower than what they have. While everyone’s financial situations are different, if the current average interest rate is more than a point lower than your current interest rate, you should consider refinancing

While not everyone is going to qualify for the current average interest rate, some people might. This means that this is a possibility worth examining. If you can qualify for a much lower interest rate, it is time to refinance.

2. Your Credit Is Good

In order for you to qualify for home loans with lower interest rates, your credit has to be in good shape. There are ways for you to improve your credit score. Paying off credit card debt, paying your bills on time, and fixing errors on your credit report are all great ways to raise your credit score. If your credit score is good, it might be time to refinance.

3. You Are Not Moving Any Time Soon

As mentioned above, you may have to pay closing costs when you refinance. Therefore, if you plan on staying in that house for a while, this could be a good time to refinance. On the other hand, you don’t want to pay closing costs just to move again next year.

These are a few of the biggest signs that indicate it is time for you to refinance. Don’t pass up this chance to save money! 

The Long-Term Toll Of College Costs

The Long-Term Toll Of College CostsTaking out enormous student loans to get a college degree may be a terrible idea for some. The burden of paying off this debt can make it far more challenging to do other important things like buying a home.

Here are some common problems that come from taking out large student loans:

  • Not Worth It: The college degree may not help you land a high-paying job. Even high-paying jobs like being a dentist have extremely high educational costs as well. Aspiring dentists borrow, on average, over $500,000 to go to dental school and spend multiple decades paying it back.
  • Tuition Hyper-Inflation: Colleges and universities saw the easy money from student loans as a great reason to increase tuition. In many institutions, tuition increases, over the past 42 years, went out of control, especially for trade schools and private universities. College costs rose by 1,400% since 1978. That is five times more than the inflation rate over the same period.
  • OverBorrowing: The easy ability that students have in many cases to over-borrow for living expenses on top of college costs means that they take bigger loans than they need and wastefully spend the money.

In the olden days, they had a phrase for a person who sold themselves into a kind of work-slavery. They called these people “indentured servants.” By taking out student loan debt that may take decades to pay back, this is a form of indentured servitude, especially because it is difficult, if not impossible to get out of paying the student loans back. Even bankruptcy does not discharge student loan debt.

If your student loan goes into default, there is the possibility of a wage garnishment, which means up to 25% of your take-home pay will be deducted from your checks and used to pay off the student loan debt. This is like a modern version of being an indentured servant.

But You Need A College Degree To Succeed, Right?

For many, earning a college degree that teaches skills and knowledge, which help get a high-paying job, is a reasonable idea. However, not all degrees are equal in their influence over getting a job. Many degree certificates are not worth the paper they are printed on. Moreover, some do better than those who have degrees.

Conclusion

What do Bill Gates, Coco Chanel, Ralph Lauren, Rachel Ray, Mark Zuckerberg, Sean “Diddy” Combs, James Cameron, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Richard Branson, Simon Cowell, Larry Ellison, Ted Turner, and Wolfgang Puck all have in common? They all do NOT have a college degree and still became immensely successful. Many are billionaires, who simply started their businesses and did not have time to finish college, so they dropped out.

Before you saddle yourself with student debt for a huge portion of the rest of your life, think carefully about the ramifications. Then, if you must borrow, borrow as little as possible and make sure you get a degree that helps get a high-paying job.

If you are in the market for a new home or interested in refinancing your current property, be sure to consult with your trusted home mortgage professional.

4 Things To Do Before Co-Signing A Mortgage For Your Child

4 Things To Do Before Co-Signing A Mortgage For Your ChildIt can be hard to convince a lender that a young person is ready to buy a house. There may not be a long credit history, a lack of assets might make it hard to fund a down payment, and the buyer’s age can cause banks to hesitate. One of the ways for parents to help with this process is to co-sign on the mortgage. Before doing this, there are a few important steps to keep in mind.

Look At Your Own Qualifications

Remember that co-signers are going to go through the same vetting process as the primary borrower. This includes someone’s income, credit history, assets, debts, and credit score are all going to be scrutinized. It might be a while since the co-signer has had to go through this process. Be sure to take a look at one’s own qualifications. Remember that any mortgage, including acting as a co-signer, will act as an outstanding debt. This might make it hard to refinance in the future.

Think About Paying The Loan

While nobody wants to think about their child being unable to pay back the loan, there is always the chance that this may happen. Therefore, think about what would happen if you need to step in and make these payments. If you cannot handle the burden of having that additional co-payment, you may want to think twice about co-signing. Failing to make these payments will not only hurt your child’s credit score but yours as well.

Protect Yourself

As a co-signer, it will be important to protect yourself before signing on the dotted line. First, be sure to do some estate planning with your child. You should encourage your child to take out a life insurance policy. While no parent wants to think about burying their child, if something happens to him or her, the co-signers are going to be on the hook for the rest of the loan. Furthermore, be sure to monitor the loan payments as well. Sign up for email or text alerts to make sure payments are being made on time.

Plan Ahead

Many parents are going to reflexively act as a co-signer for their child; however, it is important to plan ahead. Be sure to think about all possibilities and make sure that both you and your child are ready to handle an added loan payment.

If you are interested in buying a new home or refinancing your current property, be sure to consult with your trusted home mortgage professional.

3 Crucial Questions To Ask Before You Co-Sign A Mortgage

3 Crucial Questions To Ask Before You Co-Sign A MortgageA mortgage is a significant responsibility. For this reason, many people have someone co-sign with them on their mortgage. Before agreeing to co-sign on any mortgage, it is important to ask the right questions. There are several crucial questions that everyone should ask before they co-sign on someone else’s mortgage.

What Does It Mean To Co-Sign On A Mortgage?

Before signing that piece of paper, it is important to understand the responsibilities involved. Co-signing on a mortgage is a little bit different than co-signing for a credit card.

The person who is buying the home, the primary signer, lives in the property in question. The co-signer, typically, does not. On the other hand, both people signing the mortgage take on the financial risk of the mortgage. Before co-signing, understand the financial risk involved.

Is It Smart To Trust The Borrower?

One of the most important questions to ask is whether or not the borrower can be trusted. Remember, if the primary signer cannot make the payments on the mortgage, the co-signer is on the hook for those payments. Before placing any financial assets on the line, make sure the borrower can be trusted to maintain gainful employment, make smart financial decisions, and keep up with the mortgage payments.

What Are The Risks Involved?

There are a few risks that people need to think about when it comes to co-signing a mortgage. First, think about the risk to the credit score. If the primary signer makes late payments, these can impact the co-signer’s financial health and credit score as well.

In addition, there are relationship risks that everyone should think about. Most people co-sign a mortgage for a family member or friend. Having this type of financial arrangement can complicate relationships among loved ones.

Understanding The Process Of Co-Signing A Mortgage

These are only a few of the many questions that people need to ask when they are thinking about co-signing on a mortgage. Everyone who is considering co-signing must consider the financial health and responsibility of the primary signer in addition to the risks they will be taking on. Co-signing on someone else’s mortgage is a big decision. Consider the various factors involved in this decision.

As always, speak with your trusted real estate and mortgage finance professional for advice on your personal situation.